Forms G-325 and G-325A are identical questionnaires that were once used to collect biographic information to supplement Forms I-129F, I-130, and I-485. Form G-325 was used to collect biographic information from US citizens petitioning for immigration benefits on behalf of a foreign national relative. Form G-325A was used to collect biographic information from foreign national petitioners.

When USCIS updated Forms I-129F, I-130, and I-485 in 2017, the agency integrated the questions from Forms G-325 and G-325A into the new forms. Consequently, Form G-325 was discontinued, and Form G-325A is only used in deferred action cases that originated before 2017.

Along with the updates that eliminated Forms G-325 and G-325A, USCIS issued new guidance on supplementary forms, documents, and evidence that should be submitted with Forms I-129F, I-130, and I-485. Following is a detailed checklist of supplementary documentation that should be included with each of these application packets.

What to Include with Form I-129F, Petition for Alien Finance

Form I-129F is for US citizens who wish to bring their fiancé, their fiancé’s children, their spouse, or their spouse’s children to the United States to apply for lawful permanent resident status. A successful I-129F petition will award a K-1 visa to a fiancé, a K-2 visa to the fiancé’s children, a K-3 visa to a spouse, and a K-4 visa to a spouse’s children.

In addition to filing Form I-129F, the US citizen will need to include the following documents and evidence with their petition:

  • One passport-style photo of the petitioner and one of the petitioner’s fiancé/spouse, both taken within 30 days of filing Form I-129F
  • Evidence of the petitioner’s US citizenship 
  • Evidence of a legal name change (if applicable)
  • Evidence that any previous marriages were terminated (if applicable)
  • Evidence to support an IMBRA waiver (if applicable)

If the petitioner would like to classify their fiancé as a K-1 nonimmigrant, they must also include the following:

  • Evidence that the marriage will take place within 90 days of the fiancé’s admission into the United States as a K-1 nonimmigrant
  • Evidence that the petitioner and his or her fiancé met in person within 2 years of filing Form I-129F 

If the petitioner would like to classify their spouse as a K-3 nonimmigrant, they will also need to include:

  • A marriage certificate
  • Evidence that the petitioner filed Form I-130 on behalf of their spouse

What to Include with Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative

Form I-130 is for US citizens and permanent residents who need to establish their relationship to alien relatives. This form allows USCIS to recognize immediate-family status, which is necessary for many immigration benefits and applications.

In conjunction with filing Form I-130, the US citizen or permanent resident petitioner must also include the following:

  • Evidence of the petitioner’s US citizenship, lawful permanent residence, or US national status
  • Two passport-style photographs for each beneficiary
  • Relevant birth certificates (for the spouse, child, parent, and/or sibling)
  • A copy of the marriage certificate (if applicable)
  • Evidence that any previous marriages were terminated (if applicable)
  • Evidence of a bona fide marriage (if applicable)
  • Proof of a legal name change (if applicable) 

If the petitioner is filing on behalf of an adopted child, the petitioner will also need to include the following:

  • Evidence of a family relationship, such as a final adoption decree
  • Evidence that the petitioner has had legal custody of the adopted child for two years
  • Evidence that the petitioner and adopted child have lived together for two years

What to Include with Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status

Form I-485 is the primary Green Card application for immigrants who are already in the United States with valid immigrant or nonimmigrant status. Where Forms I-129F and I-130 are typically filed by a US citizen, permanent resident, or US national, Form I-485 must be completed by the immigrant seeking a Green Card.

If the petitioner is an immediate relative of a US citizen or permanent resident, they must include the following documents and evidence with their Green Card application:

  • A copy of a government-issued ID with the petitioner’s photograph
  • A copy of their birth certificate
  • Travel documents that show they were properly inspected and admitted (or inspected and paroled) into the United States
  • Two passport style photographs
  • Evidence that Form I-130 has previously been filed, such as a copy of Form I-797, Approval or Receipt Notice (unless Form I-130 is being filed concurrently with Form I-485)
  • Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, or Form I-864W, Request for Exemption for Intending Immigrant’s Affidavit of Support
  • Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal (if applicable)
  • Form I-485 Supplement A, Adjustment of Status Under Section 245(i) (Supplement A) (if applicable)
  • Form I-508, Waiver of Diplomatic Rights, Privileges, Exemptions, and Immunities (if applicable)
  • Form I-566, Interagency Record of Request – A, G, or NATO Dependent Employment Authorization or Change/Adjustment to/from A, G, or NATO Status (only if the petitioner has A, G, or NATO nonimmigrant status). 
  • Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility (if applicable)
  • Form I-612, Application for Waiver of the Foreign Residence Requirement (if applicable)
  • Official police records and certified court records of any criminal charges, arrests, and/or convictions (if applicable)

Spouses and children of a US citizen’s immediate relatives must independently qualify for a Green Card and file a separate application. They cannot qualify for an adjustment of status as the derivative beneficiary based on the immediate family member’s application. Immigrants in this situation (sometimes referred to as Family Preference Immigrants) must include all of the previously mentioned documents and evidence, and the following:

  • Proof that the petitioner has continuously maintained a lawful status since arriving the United States
  • Documentation to validate the petitioner’s relationship to the principal applicant, such as a birth certificate, marriage certificate, or adoption decree

Immigrants who are not immediate family members of US citizens or permanent residents may still qualify for a Green Card under employment-based conditions. Petitioners who fit within this category will need to include all of the documents and evidence that were previously discussed for family members, as well as the following supplementary items:

  • Documentation of their immigrant category, such as Form I-797, Approval or Receipt Notice (unless filing Form I-485 concurrently with Form I-140)
  • Proof that the petitioner has continuously maintained a lawful status since arriving the United States
  • Form I-485 Supplement J, Confirmation of Bona Fide Job Offer (if applicable)
  • A signed statement that the petitioner intends to work in the occupational field specified in Form I-140 (if a self-petitioner)

 

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