JacksonWhite Criminal Law http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law Criminal defense attorneys in Mesa, Phoenix and Tempe, Arizoan Tue, 25 Aug 2015 20:02:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Can I be sentenced to jail if I can’t afford my court fine in Arizona? http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/05/15/can-i-be-sentenced-to-jail-if-i-cant-afford-my-court-fine-in-arizona/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/05/15/can-i-be-sentenced-to-jail-if-i-cant-afford-my-court-fine-in-arizona/#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 17:00:05 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12740 Yes, failure to pay the fines and court fees associated with being in the criminal justice system can lead to jail time. However, the courts do offer defendants an option to pay the fees in increments, but missed payments will lead to penalties and added interest, which could make the fees unaffordable. Common Court Fees during Pre-Conviction and Sentencing in AZ Application fee to obtain public defender Jail fee for pre-trial incarceration Jury fees Rental fee for electronic monitoring devices Sentencing Fines with accompanying surcharges Restitution Fees for court administrative costs Fees for designated funds (e.g. libraries, prison construction, etc.)

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Yes, failure to pay the fines and court fees associated with being in the criminal justice system can lead to jail time.

However, the courts do offer defendants an option to pay the fees in increments, but missed payments will lead to penalties and added interest, which could make the fees unaffordable.

Common Court Fees during Pre-Conviction and Sentencing in AZ

  • Application fee to obtain public defender
  • Jail fee for pre-trial incarceration
  • Jury fees
  • Rental fee for electronic monitoring devices
  • Sentencing
  • Fines with accompanying surcharges
  • Restitution
  • Fees for court administrative costs
  • Fees for designated funds (e.g. libraries, prison construction, etc.)
  • Public defender reimbursement fees
  • Prosecution reimbursement fees

Consequences for Nonpayment of Fines

According to A.R.S. 13-810:

  1. If the court finds that the defendant has willfully failed to pay a fine.
    1. Order the defendant incarcerated in the county jail until the fine, fee, restitution, or incarceration costs are paid.
    2. Revoke the defendant’s probation, parole, or community supervision and sentence the defendant to prison pursuant to law.
  2. If the court finds that the defendant cannot pay despite sufficient good faith efforts.
    1. Modify the manner in which the restitution, fine, fee, or incarceration costs are to be paid.
    2. Enter any reasonable order that would assure compliance with the order to pay.

Pay or Stay

Court fees can quickly add up to hundreds, or even thousands of dollars. In most states, defendants can even be billed after their sentencing for ‘room and board’ costs while they were in jail. There are also fees associated with probation and electronic monitoring devices.

Individuals on probation have to pay for their court-mandated drug and alcohol screenings. Essentially, the fees for committing a crime keep coming until the very end of the process. However, there are usually alternatives like community service for some of these fines. If you’re looking to avoid some of the fees that occur when you’re being charged with a crime, the criminal lawyers at JacksonWhite may be able to help.

Are you facing criminal charges in Arizona?

If you’re facing criminal charges in Tempe, Mesa, Scottsdale, Chandler, Phoenix, Peoria, or any other AZ city, the criminal attorneys at JacksonWhite can help. Our criminal defense lawyers will work with you to have the charges against you and their associated fines reduced or possibly dismissed. Call (480) 818 9943 to schedule a free and private consultation with dedicated JacksonWhite criminal defense attorney, Jeremy Geigle.

Check out the JW criminal defense results page to see how we’ve helped past clients deal with their criminal charges in Arizona.

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Shoplifting Firearms in Arizona http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/05/13/shoplifting-firearms-in-arizona/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/05/13/shoplifting-firearms-in-arizona/#comments Wed, 13 May 2015 17:00:55 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12734 Shoplifting is considered a theft crime in Arizona and comes with serious penalties. The consequences for shoplifting and other theft crimes depend largely on the monetary value of the items stolen. However, that is not the case when it comes to shoplifting firearms in AZ. Shoplifting Firearms in AZ Regardless of the value of the property stolen, a person found guilty of shoplifting firearms in Arizona is guilty of a class 6 felony. This charge carries severe penalties, including up to one year in prison. Penalties for Shoplifting Firearms in Arizona The potential sentences for a class 6 felony in

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Shoplifting is considered a theft crime in Arizona and comes with serious penalties. The consequences for shoplifting and other theft crimes depend largely on the monetary value of the items stolen. However, that is not the case when it comes to shoplifting firearms in AZ.

Shoplifting Firearms in AZ

Regardless of the value of the property stolen, a person found guilty of shoplifting firearms in Arizona is guilty of a class 6 felony. This charge carries severe penalties, including up to one year in prison.

Penalties for Shoplifting Firearms in Arizona

The potential sentences for a class 6 felony in AZ can be found below:

Felony Mitigated Minimum Presumptive Maximum Aggravated
Class 6 .33 year .5 year 1 year 1.5 years 2 years

In addition to incarceration, a shoplifting charge may also result in large fines, a suspension of your gun rights, and a criminal record, among others.

Charged with shoplifting firearms in AZ?

Are you facing charges for shoplifting firearms in Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Phoenix, or another AZ city? If so, the criminal defense lawyers at JacksonWhite can help. Call us today at (480) 818 9943 to schedule a free and confidential consultation with a dedicated JacksonWhite theft defense attorney.

Click here to see how we’ve helped others facing shoplifting charges in Arizona.

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AZ Traffic Law: Why You Should Ask for the Officer’s Notes http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/05/11/az-traffic-law-why-you-should-ask-for-the-officers-notes/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/05/11/az-traffic-law-why-you-should-ask-for-the-officers-notes/#comments Mon, 11 May 2015 17:00:05 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12728 Unless you were charged with criminal speeding and are facing serious penalties like jail time, it is often less expensive to simply pay the fines associated with minor traffic violations than it is to hire a criminal defense attorney to defend you. However, there is a third option: you can defend yourself in court if you believe that the traffic ticket was given improperly. Fighting a Traffic Ticket in Arizona If you wish to fight the violation in court, you should be prepared with a defense. The best resource you can obtain for fighting a traffic violation in Arizona is

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Unless you were charged with criminal speeding and are facing serious penalties like jail time, it is often less expensive to simply pay the fines associated with minor traffic violations than it is to hire a criminal defense attorney to defend you. However, there is a third option: you can defend yourself in court if you believe that the traffic ticket was given improperly.

Fighting a Traffic Ticket in Arizona

If you wish to fight the violation in court, you should be prepared with a defense. The best resource you can obtain for fighting a traffic violation in Arizona is the officer’s notes.

Most officers are trained to take notes when citing someone for a traffic violation. Typically, these notes are taken on the back of your ticket and detail the reasons for why you were stopped, as well as the conditions and other variables.

If an officer knows their notes are inaccurate, and thinks you may be fighting the violation, they may decide not to show up to the hearing. In most cases, an officer’s failure to show up results in an automatic dismissal of charges.

Obtaining a Copy of the Officer’s Notes in Arizona

You have the right to obtain a copy of the notes through the discovery process, which allows for the exchange of important information prior to a trial. In addition to the notes, you can also request copies of police procedure manuals and instruction manuals for speed recording devices.

It is not common for people to make discovery requests for information related to traffic violations, so it’s possible that your request will be denied. If this happens, try reiterating in writing that you requested the information because it is crucial to your case.

Why would the notes be helpful?

By reviewing the officer’s notes, you will get a good idea of how they will testify in trial, as well as how best to prepare your defense. An officer won’t want to get into trouble over a traffic violation, so they will rarely, if ever, deviate from their notes.

What should I look for when reviewing the notes?

  • Amount of detail. If the notes are highly detailed, you should be able to identify areas for questioning. On the other hand, if the notes lack detail, you can question the officer on specifics they failed to record. The more times an officer says “I don’t remember,” the better your defense.
  • Look for missing details. The notes should include exactly how the officer recorded your speed or other violation, the exact location of the violation, road conditions, which lane you were in, and nearby vehicles.
  • Diagrams. Some officers will draw simple diagrams in their notes to show an intersection or other important factors. If a diagram is missing, or the existing one is poor, you can use that to your advantage during trial.
  • Statements. Officers usually record any statements you made during the stop. You should check whether the statement is recorded as a quote or approximation.

The criminal defense attorneys at JacksonWhite wish you all the best in fighting your traffic violation in court. If we can be of service for other charges like DUI, drug crimes, juvenile crimes, domestic violence, or other serious criminal charges in Arizona, dial (480) 818 9943 to schedule a free and confidential consultation with a dedicated JacksonWhite criminal lawyer today.

Click here to see how we’ve helped others dealing with criminal charges in AZ.

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When and Why Would an Attorney Withdraw from a Case? http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/04/29/when-and-why-would-an-attorney-withdraw-from-a-case/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/04/29/when-and-why-would-an-attorney-withdraw-from-a-case/#comments Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:00:01 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12721 The court proceedings involving Maricopa County Sheriff, Joe Arpaio may be old news, but the fact that his attorney has recently withdrawn himself from the case is not. On Friday, the attorney representing Arpaio in his contempt trial, Tim Casey, submitted a motion to Judge Murray Snow asking for approval to withdraw from the case, stating he is “ethically required” to do so. Karen Clark, legal counsel for Casey, says that the withdraw request comes in response to a testimony given by the Sheriff last week. In the testimony, Arpaio reportedly disclosed that Casey had hired a private investigator to

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The court proceedings involving Maricopa County Sheriff, Joe Arpaio may be old news, but the fact that his attorney has recently withdrawn himself from the case is not. On Friday, the attorney representing Arpaio in his contempt trial, Tim Casey, submitted a motion to Judge Murray Snow asking for approval to withdraw from the case, stating he is “ethically required” to do so.

Karen Clark, legal counsel for Casey, says that the withdraw request comes in response to a testimony given by the Sheriff last week. In the testimony, Arpaio reportedly disclosed that Casey had hired a private investigator to confirm statements allegedly made by Judge Snow’s wife, who is accused of saying that her husband “wanted to do everything to make sure [Arpaio] is not elected.”

To further complicate the matter, Arpaio’s Chief Deputy, Jerry Sheridan, apparently made a separate testimony in which he stated that there was no private investigation into Judge Snow or any members of his family.

Attorneys can fire their clients?!

As a client, you have the luxury of firing your attorney at any time for any reason under the sun. Attorneys, however, are not offered the same privilege. If an attorney wants to withdraw from a case, they must have a valid reason to do so.

There are some circumstances in which an attorney is ethically required to withdraw from a case and other situations when an attorney may apply to do so with a valid reason.

Under what circumstances is an attorney ethically required to withdraw from a case?

A lawyer may be legally required to withdraw from a case if the following applies:

  • The attorney is violating a law or the rules of professional conduct.
  • The attorney has been suspended from practicing law by a disciplinary committee.
  • The client wishes to terminate their relationship with the attorney.
  • The attorney is physically or mentally incapable of representing their client.
  • The attorney or their firm is representing an adversary party in the case. This is also known as a conflict of interest.

Under what circumstances may an attorney apply to withdraw from a case?

An attorney may submit a motion to withdraw from a case if they have a valid reason to do so. Commonly accepted reasons include:

  • Failure to pay attorneys’ fees. Regardless of whether a client signed a contract with their attorney prior to representation, the client has the obligation to pay their attorney for any services performed.
  • Conflicting case strategies. When a client and their attorney cannot reach an agreement regarding case strategy, it is often in the client’s best interest for the attorney to withdraw.
  • Criminal, unethical, or fraudulent activity by the client. An attorney cannot help you commit activities which may be deemed criminal, unethical, or fraudulent.
  • Client’s failure to fulfill obligations. A successful attorney-client relationship involves a good deal of communication on behalf of both parties. If the client is failing to provide their attorney with requested information or documents, the attorney may seek to withdraw from the case.
  • Client consent. If the attorney receives permission from their client to withdraw from the case, they may do so.
  • Personality conflicts. When attorneys and clients are unable to get along amicably, the likeliness of a successful case outcome diminishes dramatically, and it is often in the best interests of both parties for the attorney to withdraw from the case.

Please keep in mind: it is extremely rare for an attorney to submit a motion to withdraw from a case.

Arizona Criminal Defense Attorney

If you have been charged with a crime in Mesa, Tempe, Phoenix, Chandler, or another Arizona city, the criminal lawyers at JacksonWhite will work with you to devise the best defense for your case. Call us today at (480) 818 9943 to schedule a free and private consultation with dedicated JacksonWhite criminal defense lawyer, Jeremy Geigle.

Click here to see how we’ve helped others facing criminal charges in Arizona.

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Can I get a sex crime conviction set aside in Arizona? http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/04/24/can-i-get-a-sex-crime-conviction-set-aside-in-arizona/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/04/24/can-i-get-a-sex-crime-conviction-set-aside-in-arizona/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 17:00:38 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12716 Before answering that question, the process of setting aside a criminal conviction in Arizona should first be explained. A.R.S. 13-907 states that an individual convicted of a criminal offense, who has fulfilled the conditions of their probation or sentence and has been discharged by the court, may apply to a judge, justice of the peace, or magistrate to have their judgment set aside. The offender shall be informed of this right at the time of their discharge. Can anyone apply on my behalf? Yes, Arizona law allows the offender’s attorney or probation officer to apply to set aside the judgment.

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Before answering that question, the process of setting aside a criminal conviction in Arizona should first be explained. A.R.S. 13-907 states that an individual convicted of a criminal offense, who has fulfilled the conditions of their probation or sentence and has been discharged by the court, may apply to a judge, justice of the peace, or magistrate to have their judgment set aside. The offender shall be informed of this right at the time of their discharge.

Can anyone apply on my behalf?

Yes, Arizona law allows the offender’s attorney or probation officer to apply to set aside the judgment.

What happens to my criminal record after my conviction is set aside in AZ?

If your application is granted, your judgment of guilt shall be set aside, accusations against you will be dismissed, and you will be released from all penalties and disabilities resulting from the conviction.

If any of your civil liberties were revoked as a result of your conviction, such as your rights to vote or carry a concealed weapon, those rights will be restored after your conviction is set aside.

Can a sex crime conviction be set aside in AZ?

Back to the initial question: can sex crime convictions be set aside in Arizona? The answer is no, they cannot. A.R.S. 13-907 also states that people convicted of criminal offenses involving the following situations may not apply to have their conviction set aside:

-A crime involving a dangerous weapon.

-A crime which requires the offender to register as a sex offender under A.R.S. 13-3821.

-A crime involving sexual motivation.

-A crime involving a victim under the age of 15.

Charged with a sex crime in Arizona?

Have you been accused of a sex crime in Phoenix, Tempe, Glendale, Mesa, or another AZ city? The criminal defense lawyers at JacksonWhite can help. While we can’t apply to have your conviction set aside, our sex crime attorneys will work to have your penalties decreased. Call us today at (480) 818 9943 to schedule a FREE and confidential consultation with JacksonWhite criminal attorney, Jeremy Geigle.

Click here to see how we’ve helped others charged with sex crimes in Arizona.

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Prescription Fraud in Arizona http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/30/prescription-fraud-in-arizona/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/30/prescription-fraud-in-arizona/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 17:00:42 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12706 Addiction to prescription medication has become a widespread problem in the United States over recent years. As opposed to illegal substances like heroin, meth, or cocaine, prescription medication is prescribed by a doctor and is legal to consume if you are the person to whom the drug is prescribed. What is prescription fraud in AZ? Prescription fraud can come in many forms, including but not limited to the situations described below: A person is prescribed medication by a doctor and then sells or gives the drugs to others. A doctor prescribes a dosage too high or for too long a

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Addiction to prescription medication has become a widespread problem in the United States over recent years. As opposed to illegal substances like heroin, meth, or cocaine, prescription medication is prescribed by a doctor and is legal to consume if you are the person to whom the drug is prescribed.

What is prescription fraud in AZ?

Prescription fraud can come in many forms, including but not limited to the situations described below:

  1. A person is prescribed medication by a doctor and then sells or gives the drugs to others.
  2. A doctor prescribes a dosage too high or for too long a period of time.
  3. A person fakes an injury or illness in attempts to obtain a prescription.
  4. A person falsifies identification documents in attempts to obtain a prescription.
  5. A person attempts to forge a prescription.
  6. A person attempts to have legitimate prescriptions filled at numerous locations.
  7. A doctor prescribes drugs to a patient for recreational purposes, rather than medicinal.

Basically, prescription fraud can occur if any situation other than this occurs: a doctor legitimately prescribes medication for a legitimate illness or injury and the person to whom the medicine is prescribed is the only person consuming or interacting with the drugs.

Charges for Prescription Fraud in Arizona

A.R.S. 13-3406 defines the penalties and charges for prescription fraud in AZ, which depend upon the details of the offense.

-Possess or use a prescription-only drug without a valid prescription from a licensed prescriber: class 1 misdemeanor.

-Possess equipment and chemicals for the purpose of manufacturing a prescription-only drug without the proper license: class 1 misdemeanor.

-Manufacture a prescription-only drug without the proper license: class 1 misdemeanor.

-Administer a prescription-only drug to another person whose possession violates Arizona law: class 1 misdemeanor.

-Obtain a prescription-only drug by fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation: class 1 misdemeanor.

-Possess a prescription-only drug for sale without the proper license: class 6 felony.

-Unless authorized to do so, transports for sale, imports into this state, or offers to transport for sale or import into this state any prescription-only drugs: class 6 felony.

Penalties for Prescription Fraud in AZ

A conviction for prescription fraud in Arizona can land someone with jail or prison time, hefty fines, mandatory drug treatment, driver’s license suspension, community service, probation, and a damaging criminal record.

Arizona Drug Crimes Attorney

If you’ve been accused of prescription fraud in AZ, the drug crime lawyers at JacksonWhite can help you decrease your penalties and charges and will work to get you into a rehabilitation program to avoid incarceration. Call us today at (480) 818 9943 to schedule a free and confidential consultation with a dedicated JacksonWhite criminal attorney today.

Click here to see how we’ve helped others dealing with drug crimes in Arizona.

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Can I be charged with a crime in Arizona if my dog bit someone? http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/25/can-i-be-charged-with-a-crime-in-arizona-if-my-dog-bit-someone/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/25/can-i-be-charged-with-a-crime-in-arizona-if-my-dog-bit-someone/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 17:00:28 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12697 The answer to that question depends upon the details of the incident, but yes, it is possible for an owner of a dog who bit another person to be criminally liable under Arizona law. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, there are approximately 70-80 million dogs owned by humans in the United States. While most of them serve as loving and playful companions, some have a greater tendency towards aggression. In 2002, there were reportedly around 4.5 million people who suffered dog bites in this country, with nearly half of those being under the

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The answer to that question depends upon the details of the incident, but yes, it is possible for an owner of a dog who bit another person to be criminally liable under Arizona law.

According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, there are approximately 70-80 million dogs owned by humans in the United States. While most of them serve as loving and playful companions, some have a greater tendency towards aggression.

In 2002, there were reportedly around 4.5 million people who suffered dog bites in this country, with nearly half of those being under the age of 12.

My dog bit someone. What am I liable for?

In Arizona, the owner and/or person(s) responsible for the dog may be legally obligated to pay for the victim’s damages. The victim may be entitled to compensation for the following:

  • Injuries to or loss of life of pets attacked by the dog
  • Medical care costs, ambulance charges, doctors’ fees, and emergency room costs
  • Loss of earnings
  • Estimated costs of future medical care
  • Counseling
  • Costs of repairing or replacing personal property

How am I supposed to pay for that?! Will my insurance help?

In most cases in AZ, victims are compensated by the dog owner’s homeowner’s insurance policy. In 2002, it was estimated that homeowner’s insurance policy claims for dog bites paid out more than $1 billion.

Other types of insurance may also cover the damages including renter’s insurance, dog owner’s insurance, landlord’s insurance, or business insurance.

Can I be criminally charged if my dog bites someone in AZ?

While this is fairly uncommon, it is possible for you to face class 6 felony charges in Arizona if your dog bites another person and one or both of the following apply:

  1. The owner or responsible party knew or had reason to know that the dog had a propensity to attack, cause injury, or otherwise endanger the safety of others without being provoked.
  2. The dog has been found to be a vicious animal by a court or competent authority.

Is Arizona a “one free bite” state?

Some states have a dog bite law that allows for one “free bite,” or a warning. In those states, the owner or person responsible for the dog cannot be held liable for damages caused the first time their dog bites another person unless they knew or should have known that the dog had a propensity for aggression.

Arizona is not a one free bite state, and owners or responsible parties can be held liable for damages caused to the victim, even if it is the first time their dog attacked another person.

Defenses to Dog Bite Charges in Arizona

There are situations where you may not be held liable for your dog’s violence:

  1. The victim provoked the attack.
  2. The owner is a governmental agency, the dog is being utilized in military or police work, and the bite occurred while the dog was defending itself or assisting an employee of the agency.

Leash Laws in Arizona

Some local municipalities in Arizona have a leash law for dogs, meaning your dog must be on a leash anytime it is in a public area. If you are found to be in violation of this law, you may also be held liable under a negligence claim brought by the victim.

Are you facing criminal dog bite charges in AZ?

If your dog attacked another person and you are facing criminal charges, the defense attorneys from JacksonWhite can help protect your record. Our criminal lawyers will work to have the charge dropped and your penalties decreased or eliminated. Call a JacksonWhite criminal defense attorney today to schedule a free and private consultation at (480) 818 9943.

Click here to see how we’ve helped others dealing with criminal charges in Arizona.

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Multiple Shoplifting Offenses in Arizona http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/23/multiple-shoplifting-offenses-in-arizona/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/23/multiple-shoplifting-offenses-in-arizona/#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2015 17:00:33 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12693 Shoplifting addition is a real and prevalent problem in today’s society. Click here to see a previous blog detailing the reasons behind the issue and possible treatments. While some people shoplift because they truly cannot afford to pay for the items, some people commit the offense to relieve stress or regain control after a traumatic experience in their life. Shoplifting Charges in AZ A.R.S. 13-1805 states that a person commits shoplifting if, while in an establishment in which merchandise is displayed for sale, they knowingly obtain goods from the establishment with the intent to deprive the establishment of those goods

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Shoplifting addition is a real and prevalent problem in today’s society. Click here to see a previous blog detailing the reasons behind the issue and possible treatments.

While some people shoplift because they truly cannot afford to pay for the items, some people commit the offense to relieve stress or regain control after a traumatic experience in their life.

Shoplifting Charges in AZ

A.R.S. 13-1805 states that a person commits shoplifting if, while in an establishment in which merchandise is displayed for sale, they knowingly obtain goods from the establishment with the intent to deprive the establishment of those goods by:

  1. Removing goods from the immediate display or from any other place within the establishment without paying the purchase price.
  2. Paying less than the purchase price of the goods by altering, removing, substituting, or disfiguring any label, price tag, or marking.
  3. Transferring goods from one container to another.
  4. Concealment.

Penalties for Shoplifting in Arizona

In AZ, shoplifting is punished according to the value of the items stolen. The chart below details the charges that go along with shoplifting situations in AZ:

Value of Stolen Goods Charge
$2,000 or more Class 5 felony
$1,000-$1,999.99 Class 6 felony
Less than $1,000 Class 1 misdemeanor

Multiple Shoplifting Charges in AZ

Arizona law also states that a person who commits shoplifting and who has previously committed or been convicted within the past five years of two of more offenses involving burglary, shoplifting, robbery, organized retail theft, or theft is guilty of a class 4 felony.

So if you have a shoplifting addiction and are convicted of a series of theft crimes in Arizona, your charges and penalties can increase dramatically.

Are you a serial shoplifting offender in Arizona?

If you have been charged with shoplifting or other theft crimes multiple times within the past few years in AZ, it is in your best interest to retain an experienced criminal defense lawyer at JacksonWhite. Our theft crimes lawyers will work to reduce your penalties, avoid incarceration, and obtain eligibility into a rehabilitation program.

Call us today at (480) 818 9943 to schedule a free and private consultation with JacksonWhite shoplifting defense attorney, Jeremy Geigle.

Check out our results page to see how we’ve helped others dealing with shoplifting charges in Arizona.

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Understanding the Terms of Your Probation in Arizona http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/16/understanding-the-terms-of-your-probation-in-arizona/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/16/understanding-the-terms-of-your-probation-in-arizona/#comments Mon, 16 Mar 2015 17:00:10 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12686 I was sentenced to 18-24 months probation. Why not 18 or 24 months? It is not uncommon for a judge to sentence an offender to 18-24 months of probation, but what does that mean? Will your probation end after 18 months or 24? Why does the judge give a timeframe instead of a specific number of months? Review the Probation When a judge gives a sentence like 18-24 months, that means they are willing to review the terms of the probation after 18 months. What about filing for early termination? An offender can file for early termination at any time

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I was sentenced to 18-24 months probation. Why not 18 or 24 months?

It is not uncommon for a judge to sentence an offender to 18-24 months of probation, but what does that mean? Will your probation end after 18 months or 24? Why does the judge give a timeframe instead of a specific number of months?

Review the Probation

When a judge gives a sentence like 18-24 months, that means they are willing to review the terms of the probation after 18 months.

What about filing for early termination?

An offender can file for early termination at any time after your probation requirements, aside from the amount of time, have been completed. However, the motion will likely be opposed by both the prosecutor and your probation officer. It will probably be taken into consideration whether or not you violated any of the terms of your probation.

Many plea deals or probation terms include writing that limits when you can file for early termination. Consulting with a qualified criminal defense attorney will give you the best chances of having your probation terminated early.  A defense lawyer can help get your PO on board and can discuss your situation with the prosecutor.

Need assistance with your probation in Arizona?

If you need help filing for early probation termination or if you have been charged for violating your probation in AZ, the criminal defense lawyers at JacksonWhite can help. Our defense team has assisted clients in Mesa, Chandler, Phoenix, Tempe, Scottsdale, and many other Arizona cities. Schedule a free and private consultation with skilled JacksonWhite criminal attorney, Jeremy Geigle at (480) 818 9943.

Click here to see how we’ve helped other facing criminal charges in Arizona.

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Arizona DUIs: Reasons Why Your Breath Test may be Inadmissible in Court http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/11/breath-test-inadmissible/ http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/2015/03/11/breath-test-inadmissible/#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 20:03:06 +0000 http://www.jacksonwhitelaw.com/criminal-defense-law/?p=12681 DUI’s are among the most commonly committed crime in Arizona, and being charged with one has severe consequences for you and your license. What should I do if I’m pulled over for suspected DUI in AZ? If you are pulled over and ask to submit to a sobriety test in AZ, you should know that roadside DUI breathalyzers are prone to error, making them potentially inadmissible in court. It’s not until you’re taken to jail, and your BAC is analyzed by a certified breathalyzer, or your blood is drawn, that the evidence against you becomes admissible in court. However, the

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DUI’s are among the most commonly committed crime in Arizona, and being charged with one has severe consequences for you and your license.

What should I do if I’m pulled over for suspected DUI in AZ?

If you are pulled over and ask to submit to a sobriety test in AZ, you should know that roadside DUI breathalyzers are prone to error, making them potentially inadmissible in court. It’s not until you’re taken to jail, and your BAC is analyzed by a certified breathalyzer, or your blood is drawn, that the evidence against you becomes admissible in court.

However, the arresting officer may request to draw your blood during the initial stop, in which case the results will likely be admissible in court.

Preliminary Breathalyzer vs. Actual Breathalyzer

Sure, the initial breathalyzer test is enough to take you to jail, but it’s not valid enough to be used as evidence against you in court. That’s why an actual breathalyzer is used at the police station to collect the real admissible evidence in court; this device is a much larger machine with very accurate results.

Roadside breathalyzers are just a tool, like any field sobriety test, that officers can use to see whether or not you’ve consumed too much alcohol.  It’s important to remember that an officer can arrest you on suspicion of driving under the influence even if your BAC registers within the legal limit of 0.0-0.08 if they believe you to be too impaired to drive.

Is it a good idea to refuse testing?

The answer to that question depends upon a number of factors, but most notable, the test that you are being asked to submit to. Furthermore, if you refuse all tests, your license will be automatically suspended; in other words, you must submit to at least one, as you agreed to when obtaining your Arizona issued driver’s license.

With that being said, it is important to keep in mind that the field sobriety test is not mandatory and whether you pass or fail the test is extremely subjective to that particular officer. Furthermore, preliminary, roadside breathalyzer tests often give inconclusive results and evidence obtained from them will likely only harm your case.

Penalties for DUI in Arizona

DUI’s are taken very seriously in Arizona. Even a first time offense can lead to the installation of an ignition breathalyzer device for up to six months, the suspension of your license, fines, and potential incarceration.

On top of that, you can expect jail time ranging from one day to several months depending on the number of prior DUI’s you’ve had.

Are you facing DUI charges in AZ?

If you’re facing DUI charges in Phoenix, Tempe, Scottsdale, Mesa, Chandler, or any other AZ city, the criminal defense attorneys at JacksonWhite can help. The DUI lawyers at JacksonWhite will work with you to have your charges dismissed or have the repercussions reduced. Dial (480) 818-9943 to schedule a free and private consultation with dedicated JacksonWhite DUI defense attorney, Jeremy Geigle.

Check out our results page to see how we’ve helped past clients deal with their DUI charges.

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