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Tag: personal injury

Simona Wilson was electrocuted by several surges of stray current while taking a shower in the comfort of her own home.  The electric charges made their way through the shower head, which was installed not too long before.

In 2007, Wilson’s Redondo Beach home was owned by the electric company, Southern California Edison, and located next to a substation.  The home was used to house the employees of the electric company.  When Wilson moved in to the home, she was not informed of the stray electrical currents.

Close neighbors had encounters with the electric surges as well.  They heard crackling sounds coming from the power lines and even got shocked from opening their mailboxes.  It was assumed that the electrical currents were traveling from the substations through the underground gas pipes.

The electric company insisted that their substation had nothing to do with the stray voltage and claimed they tested the area.  However, a home inspector discovered 26 places where electrical currents were being given off around the house.

Southern California Edison was ordered to pay the mother of three young boys—who has nerve damage and must visit the hospital often—$1 million in compensatory damages and $3 million in punitive damages.

If you are a victim and have suffered an injury due electrocution, call an experienced Arizona attorney. To schedule a FREE consultation with Phoenix personal injury lawyer Jared Everton, call (480) 648-8928.

Christopher Bacca, 26, was awarded with “teacher of the year” at Windy Hill Elementary in Jacksonville, Florida in 2012.  However, he was fired after being accused of sexually abusing a student.

School board member Tommy Hazouri stated, “What we’ve seen as a result of it is that while he was a good teacher, he certainly had a dark side to him… What happened was a parade of horribles that shouldn’t happen to any child.”

Bacca was arrested and charged with sexual battery on a minor as well as indecent and lecherous behavior.

If you or someone you know has been a victim of child sexual abuse, contact a JacksonWhite personal injury attorney. We can fight to get you compensation to help with the recovery process.  Call (480)648-8928 to schedule a free and confidential consultation with Phoenix personal injury lawyer Jared Everton.

Clarence Cepheus Taylor, a 37-year-old man working as an evening shift dorm aide, has been found guilty of wrongfully touching three adolescent female students at the Maryland School for the Deaf.

These incidents occurred multiple times between 2008 and 2010.  The three girls ranged from ages ten to thirteen.  One girl finally told a teacher about her sexual abuse after realizing she wasn’t the only victim.

When one girl was twelve and thirteen, Taylor would embrace her and allow his hand to inappropriately touch her.

Another girl stated that when she was ten and twelve, she was victimized by Taylor when he inappropriately touched her during the night.   The same thing happened to a different girl when she was thirteen.

Taylor was suspended from his job as a teachers’ aide and arrested for three felony counts of sexual abuse of a minor.

Sexual abuse cases in schools are more common than most people think, and it is the responsibility of school districts to ensure that your child will be safe from sexual predators. If your child has been subject to any sexual abuse by a teacher or school employee, you should contact an experienced Arizona School Sexual Abuse attorney ASAP.   Call 480-648-8928 to schedule a FREE consultation with school injury lawyer, Jared Everton today.

In January of 2008, Joyce Jacobs was standing at an intersection waiting to cross the street, when an out-of-service city bus made a left-hand turn running her over and killing her. After the bus driver saw that he ran over Jacobs, he called the city’s Regional Transit instead of calling the police. John Jacobs, Joyce’s husband, filed a wrongful death claim against the city asking for $9 million.

Sacramento Regional Transit argued that Jacobs was in the middle of the street when the bus struck her, but the jury believed that she was in the lines of a crosswalk. The jury awarded pastor John Jacobs and his son $2.4 million for the death of Joyce Jacobs. The jury said that their deciding factor in the case was the fact that the bus driver didn’t call 911.

Wrongful death cases are tragic, because a family has lost a loved one and the accident could have been avoided. If you’ve lost a loved one under similar circumstances, contact a skilled JacksonWhite personal injury attorney. You can schedule a free consultation with Phoenix wrongful death lawyer, Jared Everton by calling 480-648-8928.

12 veterans of the Oregon Army National Guard filed a lawsuit against KBR, the largest non-unionized construction company in the U.S., for exposing them to a toxin called hexavalent chromium during the Restore Iraqi Oil mission in 1993. U.S. and British soldiers were hired to guard a water treatment plant that was covered with the toxic chemical.

Workers who breathe in the toxic chemical have an increased risk of developing lung cancer. One of the veterans is now confined to a wheelchair, and must breathe using an oxygen tank. The chemical can also cause damage to the eyes and skin if contact is made for a long enough period of time.

The plaintiff’s attorney said KBR should have known the soldiers were being exposed to this dangerous chemical. A jury agreed and awarded each of the 12 veterans $850,000 in compensatory damages and $6.25 million in punitive damages. After this victory, another 20 veterans are working with the legal team on another lawsuit against KBR involving the same incident.

Businesses are supposed to provide a safe work environment for its employees. In this case, KBR failed to do so; this is why a jury awarded damages to the 12 veterans. If you’ve suffered an injury because your work environment is unsafe, contact a Phoenix personal injury attorney. Call 480-648-8928 to schedule a free consultation with Mesa personal injury lawyer, Jared Everton.

In 2009, Major League Soccer player Bryan Namoff was injured after colliding with an opponent during a game. Namoff’s coach and team cleared him to continue playing in the current game, and cleared him to play in upcoming games. As he continued playing, he suffered from headaches, sleeplessness and fatigue and had to retire in 2010.

Namoff filed a personal injury lawsuit against his former team and coach for $12 million for failing to diagnose and treat him for a career-ending concussion. After the game, Namoff complained of vision problems, but no one on the team paid attention to his complaints. Namoff plans to add the team’s athletic trainer, doctor, and the doctor’s practice to the lawsuit.

After three career-ending concussions in two years, the MLS finally decided to do something about it. In 2010, the MLS formed a concussion committee and added to each team a neuropsychologist who specializes in concussions.

When a player is suspected of suffering from a concussion, he or she is to be removed from the game immediately. Arizona Revised Statute 15-341 states that a player can only return to play in a game if he or she has been cleared by a health care professional. This applies for major league sports and school sports.

If you’ve suffered an injury while playing sports because of negligent supervision, contact an experienced Phoenix personal injury attorney. Call 480-648-8928 to schedule a free consultation with Mesa sports injury lawyer, Jared Everton.

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